Drug Possession Defense Attorney for Temple Students

Possession of drugs can land you in serious legal trouble. Whether you are arrested with a drug like marijuana that is currently subject to decriminalization efforts or you were arrested with other illegal drugs, you should take a drug offense seriously. A conviction for a drug offense will attach to your criminal record and make it difficult on your personal and professional life. If you are a student at Temple University and you were arrested for drug possession, consult with an experienced Philadelphia drug possession defense attorney.

The Law Office of Lloyd Long understands the stress and uncertainty associated with a criminal proceeding, and we are here to alleviate your concerns. Criminal defense attorney Lloyd Long is devoted to providing every client with the unique legal representation they need to mount their defense. To schedule a free legal consultation to discuss your case, contact the Law Office of Lloyd Long at (215) 666-0381, or contact us online.

Pennsylvania Drug Possession Offenses

Drug possession is an offense that is correlated to the type and weight of drugs that a defendant was carrying when they were arrested. For example, being arrested with several grams of a controlled substance will almost certainly result in severe criminal penalties if convicted. The following is a list of drug offenses and the criminal penalties for those offenses.

Marijuana Possession

In Philadelphia, the possession of marijuana has been decriminalized as a result of the city’s Small Amount of Marijuana Program (SAM). The SAM program allows a defendant that was arrested with less than 30 grams of marijuana to simply pay a $25 fine instead of being subject to jail time and other penalties. Additionally, if a person was arrested for using marijuana in public, they may be offered the option to pay a $100 fine or perform community service to avoid jail time.

The greatest benefit provided by the SAM program is that a defendant will have their criminal charges dismissed and have their record scrubbed of the offense if they satisfy all requirements. Even an arrest for a small portion of marijuana could severely impact your academic world and other parts of your life.

It is important to note that other locations in Pennsylvania may still uphold stricter penalties for the possession of marijuana. For example, if you were arrested with more than 30 grams of marijuana, you can face up to a year in prison and owe $5,000 in fines. If law enforcement believes that you intended to distribute the more than 30 grams of marijuana in your possession, you can serve up to five years in prison if convicted.

Possession of Prescription Drugs

The possession of prescription drugs is also a criminal offense if you do not have a valid prescription for those drugs. For example, if you are arrested for being in possession of oxycodone, you can be charged with a first degree misdemeanor. In Pennsylvania, first degree misdemeanors carry up to one year in prison and $5,000 in fines.

If you are a repeat offender that was arrested with prescription drugs, the penalties if convicted, can be increased to two years in prison.

There are several other types of drug possession offenses that can land a defendant in serious legal trouble. A conviction for a drug offense will follow you around and make it difficult to perform various tasks like securing housing or pursuing a good job.

To learn more about drug possession offenses and how we can help with a disciplinary proceeding instituted by Temple University, continue reading and speak with an experienced Philadelphia criminal defense lawyer.

Temple University Disciplinary Hearing Defense

If you were arrested for drug possession while attending Temple University, it is likely the institution will schedule a disciplinary hearing to determine whether you should be punished academically. Fortunately, Temple University allows students to seek the aid of experienced attorneys to help with their defense during a disciplinary hearing.

Our firm can help you gather evidence and build a valid defense to minimize the impact of the drug case on your academic career. A disciplinary hearing should be taken seriously as there could be several benefits at stake. For example, violating Temple’s student code of conduct could result in losing on-campus housing privileges. To fight this possibility, you should speak with an attorney regarding your disciplinary hearing.

Work with Our Trusted Philadelphia Drug Possession Defense Lawyer

If you or a family member was arrested for the possession of drugs, contact an experienced Philadelphia drug possession defense lawyer. At the Law Office of Lloyd Long, we prefer to avoid handling a large volume of cases to ensure that each client receives our undivided attention and resources, and we would be honored to work with you. To schedule a free consultation to discuss your legal options, contact the Law Office of Lloyd Long at (215) 666-0381.

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